Wednesday, December 29, 2004

A Post-Revolutionary Business Plan, non-existent middle class speaks out.


A business view of the changes that are required.

The secret to success in Ukraine

The secret to success in Ukraine

Lessons in Orange for Ukraine and the EU

Lessons in Orange for Ukraine and the EU
The Orange Revolution proved the old saying that freedom is when the people can speak, but democracy is when the government listens.

Tuesday, December 28, 2004

Notes on Sunday Night, December 26, 2004.

They watched through the school gym'’s large windows. They watched the ballots being counted and sorted. As the piles for Yushchenko grew higher, rising well over Yanukovych'’s, it was apparent that their faith had proved correct. They knew that someday Ukraine would have freedom, and liberty, and a choice. They were patient and calm. They stayed watching all evening, over four hours. The election laws required a long, voice count, from one to one hundred, over 22 times, called out by the head of the election commission, this took time. Then it was time for the sorting of the ballots. As the stacks of fifty ballots for the candidates grew, it became apparent that Yushchenko had won the election, at least in this village, south of Kiev. The people looking in, watching the progress, were patient and calm. They had waited a lifetime for this. They know that this is perhaps their last chance for a free and fair election. They were the older women of the village. As I watched this Sunday evening, at first I thought they were being excluded from the election count. The election laws required a closed committee meeting for the vote count. Only a small group of people were allowed in. These older women were not in this small group. They looked in patiently but passively, that is an old image of Ukraine. But as we left the school, late into the night of December 26, it became apparent that I was wrong, the old women of the village had not been excluded. Sunday night, a fair and free election came out from being locked up. The old women of the village were waiting for it, in a free and open Ukraine. And they celebrated the release of the election, into the night.

Lessons from Ukraine's realistic revolution

Scotsman.com News - Ukraine - Lessons from Ukraine's realistic revolution

Reasonable look ahead for Ukraine and Europe.

Again, great information from Zerkalo Nedeli, Inside the Presidential Admin vote count.

Where the Yanukovych campaign money went.

Ukrainian Journal

Bloggledygook: The Silence of the Left.

Bloggledygook: The Silence of the Left.
Shouldn't be a great day for progressives?

Monday, December 27, 2004

eXile - Issue #205 - Putin Statue Faces Uncertain Future

eXile - Issue #205 - Putin Statue Faces Uncertain Future

Russias Fifth Column.

A great statistical package from the CEC.

This is a great place for election stats. Yushchenko gained voters (in percentage terms) in every oblast. He doubled his returns in Donesk, from 2.03% to 4.21%. Yanukovych lost ground (again in percentage terms) in every oblast. Perhaps the most interesting turn around is in the Kirovagrad Oblast. It was reported that in the 2nd round the oblast vote was heavily doctored. International observers reported hundreds of opportunities for fraud. In the third round (or rerun of the 2nd vote), Yushchenko gained over 16% points from the 2nd round. It just shows how a little sun light can clear things up.

Yuschenko's New Year's Speech on Maidan.

BBC NEWS | Europe | Russians rush to re-think Ukraine

BBC NEWS | Europe | Russians rush to re-think Ukraine

Tuesday, December 21, 2004

Ukrainian dinner party tips,

Selected Tips from
Emily Post's
Etiquette for Ukrainian Dinner Parties

The Sin Of Their Mouths, The Word Of Their Lips. Myroslav MARYNOVYCH. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

The Sin Of Their Mouths, The Word Of Their Lips. Myroslav MARYNOVYCH. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

Crime and punishment.

Game Start. Vitaliy PORTNYKOV. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

Game Start. Vitaliy PORTNYKOV. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

Russia and Ukraine and presidential elections.

Tuesday, December 14, 2004

The Maidan: Anatomy Of A Soul. Tatiana SILINA, SERHII RAKHMANIN, Olga DMITRICHEVA. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

The Maidan: Anatomy Of A Soul. Tatiana SILINA, SERHII RAKHMANIN, Olga DMITRICHEVA. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

Another great article from Zerkalo Nedeli.

Monday, December 13, 2004

eXile - Issue #204 - Feature Story - Donetsk Paper Tigers - By Jake Rudnitsky

eXile - Issue #204 - Feature Story - Donetsk Paper Tigers - By Jake Rudnitsky
Always unique Exile viewpoint on Donetsk

Yanukovych -- Left, Right or Nowhere?

Le Sabot Post-Moderne: Ukraine Archives
good definition of Yanukovych's political placement

A revolution of aspirations

This revolution has been one of aspirations. It is the barriers to enterprise and opportunity that has been rebelled against. The emerging Ukrainian middle class had hit a barrier of corruption that had limited entry into industries and opportunities to those who where willing to pay bribes and align themselves to the powers that be. A small business wishing to expand would find administrative barriers rise up blocking the expansion. Local and regional governments saw business opportunities as a vehicle to wealth and control. The funding and support of the revolution has not come from large industries, for the most part, but from entrepreneurs and professional people who see the revolt as a way to break down these barriers. Most Ukrainians have seen worlds where small businesses prosper. Most have traveled to Western Europe and North America and have seen a different economic environment. Even in countries such as Egypt and Turkey, vacationing Ukrainians could see vibrant small businesses. For the past ten years, the Ukrainian leadership has not seen this growth in aspirations, if they did see it, they did not understand its power.

Not the first time?

Askold Krushelnycky in Kiev
The Independent, London, United Kingdom, Sun, Dec 13, 2004
http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/story.jsp?story=592525
 
There are historical precedents. Soviet intelligence agents were responsible
for the shooting in a Paris church in 1924 of the leader of a short-lived
Ukrainian state, Symon Petlyura. Ukraine's most prominent post-war
nationalist leader, Stepan Bandera, was assassinated in Munich in 1959
by a pistol firing a poisonous mist which brought on a heart attack.

 

Saturday, December 11, 2004

Transatlantic Intelligencer: Europe's Ukraine III: Who Supports Yushchenko? - Leftist Fantasies and German Realities

Transatlantic Intelligencer: Europe's Ukraine III: Who Supports Yushchenko? - Leftist Fantasies and German Realities
funding the Orange.

Friday, December 10, 2004

Yushchenko news conference

Victor Yushchenko's press conference was actually on the Channel 1+1 news. During the first two rounds of election, his news conferences never were aired on any major TV stations

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | 'The country called me'

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | 'The country called me'

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Can Ukraine survive the 'Orange Revolution'?

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Can Ukraine survive the 'Orange Revolution'?
a good travelogue of Ukraine's political/social landscape.

Thursday, December 09, 2004

Go to Kyiv, just do it! The Day,


Meanwhile, today everyone is living with incredible tension: how will all this end? Many of us have grown accustomed to losing so much that, despite themselves, they find it hard to expect a happy ending, especially if such an ending means significant and immediate changes in our life, society, and in our own moral and behavior. But no matter how it ends, Ukrainians will no longer be a people with only two strategies of behavior: either “keeping mum” or “remaining silent with horror.”

Wednesday, December 08, 2004

Economist.com | Russia, Ukraine and the West

Economist.com | Russia, Ukraine and the West
A solid recap.

Yushchenko poisoned confirmed

Times Online - World

Tuesday, December 07, 2004

Conversations of voting fraud, Part 2

Monday, December 06, 2004

THE SPIRIT AND THE LETTER. SERHII RAKHMANIN. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

THE SPIRIT AND THE LETTER. SERHII RAKHMANIN. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB
From now on, nobody will ever try to abuse these rights so cynically and insolently as it happened before. If you have doubts about this, take a walk to Independence Square…

Rising To Maidan. Yulia MOSTOVAYA. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

Rising To Maidan. Yulia MOSTOVAYA. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB:
We are witnesses to and participants in a clash between the Soviet and the European civilizations. People with a European vision who cherish universal values of the civilized world have outnumbered those who, for a number of reasons, cannot or will not shed the uniform Soviet mentality. It came as a surprise to both Ukrainians themselves and to the world at large.

At the Turning-Point of Civilization. Yehor SOBOLEV. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB

At the Turning-Point of Civilization. Yehor SOBOLEV. Zerkalo Nedeli On The WEB: "They smile skeptically at the explanation that demonstrators in the streets stood up not for Viktor Yushchenko but for elected authorities, freedom of the press, and honest rules of business, all of which Yushchenko symbolizes."

Weekend thoughts

The organization of the protests has been great. That so many people can gather without major problems and without any major police presence is significant.  Apparently the crime rate in the city has dropped by 40%.

 

There has been a broadening of television coverage of the protests. Inter and 1+1 have started to be more open in their coverage and these two channels have far more resources than Channel 5. Channel 5 will be always be remembered as the channel that kept the truth on the air while being under tremendous pressure to alter its coverage. I suspect that both Inter and 1+1 will suffer long-term harm from their one sided, power oriented coverage. That Inter broadcasted the first few days of the protests from the Yanukovych campaign headquarters, renamed “Democracy Center”, sums up its campaign coverage.

 

The Russian television has poured a tremendous amount of vile and lies into its coverage. At some point the truth will leak into the Russian media and a great deal of back tracking will have to go on. If Ukrainians do move away from their dependence and acceptance of Russian TV, it will be a result of the Russian news coverage of the election.

 

In greater Kiev, life seems to go on. The food stores and bazaars were very full over the weekend. Public transport is running. There are a great many cars on the streets but heavy traffic has been a growing problem for the city for years now. The Kiev Metro system is being stressed but it is still functioning well. There appears no real food shortage and people do not seem too be hoarding.

Ukraine Leader, Attacking Rival, Won't Halt Vote

The New York Times > International > Europe > Ukraine Leader, Attacking Rival, Won't Halt Vote

Interview with President Kuchma. Steven Lee Myers, NY Times

Sunday, December 05, 2004

'If the old regime tries to interfere, we will simply storm our way into office'

Telegraph | News | 'If the old regime tries to interfere, we will simply storm our way into office'
Interview with Viktor Yushchenko, by Con Coughlin

The interference with the CEC "Election" computer system

Maidan - News - New lawsuit: the interference with the CEC "Election" computer system

Kiev Protesters Look Beyond Vote (washingtonpost.com)

Kiev Protesters Look Beyond Vote (washingtonpost.com)

Kuchma offered get-out clause

The Observer | International | Kuchma offered get-out clause

Keep out of jail card for Huchma.

Sunday Observer, Nick Paton Walsh

Heeding the Roar of the Street

The New York Times > Week in Review > Heeding the Roar of the Street

General discussion on non-violent public protests.

Saturday, December 04, 2004

BBC NEWS | World | Europe | Ukraine court ruling: Excerpts

BBC NEWS | World | Europe | Ukraine court ruling: Excerpts

Usually pheasants are shot while the're signing, Pavlo Zhovnirenko


Sobering tales from the Donbass. Maidan Stories

s: Let My People Go

The New York Times > Opinion > Op-Ed Columnist: Let My People Go

The NY Times pulls up the big guns, Nicholas D. Kristof in Kiev

Friday, December 03, 2004

Victor Yuschenko's commentary in the Wall Street Journal, Dec. 3, 2004

               "OUR UKRAINE"

COMMENTARY: By Viktor Yushchenko
The Wall Street Journal, New York, NY
Friday, December 3, 2004; Page A18

KIEV -- For months, Ukraine's democratic forces warned officials in Kiev
and other European capitals that our autumn presidential election would be
neither free nor fair. Two of the main reasons for this conclusion were the
incumbent government's unprecedented interference in the pre-election
campaign and its censorship of the mass media.

During the first election round on Oct. 31, regional governors colluded
with police and other state officials to stuff ballot boxes, falsify vote
counts and intimidate election commissions. Ukraine's central and
territorial election commissions turned a blind eye and overlooked our
well-documented official complaints. In the end, despite massive
falsifications by my opponent, the central election commission was
forced to concede that I won the first round of voting.

During the Nov. 21 runoff vote, polling stations in the eastern regions
remained open two hours after they were supposed to close officially.
Some reported voter turnout exceeding 100%, while in other regions
up to 35% of the ballots cast were from people's homes. Election
observers were prevented from monitoring voting and counting procedures
at thousands of polling stations, as permitted by Ukrainian law. Thousands
of poll watchers from democratic parties together with average citizens
witnessed traveling thugs with police escorts harassing election
commissioners, destroying polling stations, stuffing ballots, abusing
absentee voter certificates and switching commission protocols, to name
just a few of the 11,000 violations officially filed by us in the courts. We
are now patiently awaiting the Supreme Court's review of these complaints
in the hope that justice will prevail.

The last straw in the government's election fraud efforts came Monday
morning, Nov. 22, when the central election commission's voting results
showed Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych winner of the election,
despite two independent exit polls showing otherwise.

Official Kiev did not anticipate that hundreds of thousands of voters
would take to the streets to defend their constitutional right to vote and
peacefully protest against falsified election results. They couldn't,
because since the March 2002 parliamentary election, Ukraine's leaders
have turned a deaf ear to voter calls for real political and economic
change.

They failed to recognize that two-thirds of Ukraine's citizens are
dissatisfied with their leaders and their policies. They failed to recognize
that no longer will people tolerate the gap between declared and real
rights. They thought they could get away with staying in power by illegal
means. They wanted the international community to remain silent.

Now, they are forced to recognize that citizens have taken matters into
their own hands. The last vestiges of remaining public trust in official
Kiev, both at home and abroad, were permanently severed when the
corrupt and blind government unashamedly stole from its people the
most fundamental of all rights -- the right to choose one's destiny.

Ukraine's people have spoken, and I am confident that we will find a
solution to the complex political crisis that has developed as a result of
the regime's efforts to steal the election. The most logical way out of the
crisis is for repeat voting to be held speedily within the next two weeks.
Talks involving international mediators this week reaffirmed this.

For European and other observers, I believe there are four important
conclusions that should be made with regard to current events in Ukraine .

* This year Europe has witnessed two fundamental political changes: In
the first half of the year, the enlargement of the European Union to include
eight countries from the old Soviet bloc, and in the second half -- the
presidential elections in Ukraine . What will happen in my country after
the election will not only impact Ukraine's future, but, to a great extent,
the future of Europe and Russia.

* Thanks to television, the world today has seen a genuinely different
Ukraine . Observers will no longer associate Ukraine with just Chernobyl,
or corrupt regimes, or another scandal involving high-ranking officials. The
world is witnessing a noble European nation, one that embraces genuine
democratic values and, even more importantly, one that will stand up to
defend these values with dignity.

The world has seen how millions of people took to the streets and squares.
For nearly two weeks, in biting cold, hundreds of thousands bravely,
steadfastly and at the same time gracefully demonstrated their unwavering
opposition to a corrupt, authoritarian regime. The world has looked into
the eyes of millions of good people of various ages, confessions, different
ethnic backgrounds -- all peacefully, as is their right under their own
Constitution -- fighting for their rights. All without unrest, violence and
blood: This is what the world community has seen.

* The people of Ukraine have shown the world that we are much more
ready to integrate into the European community than the ruling regime.
Our path to Europe is not obstructed by formalities -- the absence of a
formal application or a joint-action plan. No one saw a civil society in
Ukraine and the desire to live according to EU standards and values.
Now -- you've seen.

It is important to recognize that people's demands made from the street are
supported by the entire system of popularly elected representatives -- local
councils, mayors, and Ukraine's Parliament, the Verkhovna Rada. Only
those officials appointed by the president have adopted a position to the
contrary.

* Currently the outgoing regime is menacing Europe with the threat of
separatism and the dissolution of Ukraine . I state with full responsibility
for my words: This is a fictional, artificial threat. It does not exist. The
people of Ukraine recognize that an economically prosperous nation-
state tolerant of its bilingualism and multiethnic society, and respectful
of all religious confessions, is Ukraine's strength and not her weakness.

It is true that today, leading officials in regions which resorted to the
largest number of election falsifications are now frightened when faced with
taking responsibility for their crimes. They are trying to play the card of
regional separatism, by adopting illegal decisions and threatening us with
referendums. This process will be halted immediately. We will not allow
three governors appointed by the president to tear apart our united country.
And, besides, those officials will face a penalty even greater than that for
election falsification from three to 15 years in prison.

Ukraine's democratic opposition movement stands for a peaceful resolution
to the current political crisis. We oppose the use of force and will not
allow anyone to smother our freedom by force. We are a genuine force, a
wise one, which will lead our people to legitimate victory based on law.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Yushchenko, Ukraine's prime minister from 1999-2001, leads the
country's democratic opposition movement and is a candidate for the
presidency of Ukraine .

SueAndNotU

SueAndNotU: "Democracy is the New Imperialism"

A great description of the democracy building that has been going on in Ukraine for many years.

The New York Times > International > Europe > Ukrainian Justices, in Show of Independence, Order New Runoff

The New York Times > International > Europe > Ukrainian Justices, in Show of Independence, Order New Runoff

A solid summary, most importantly:

Roman M. Zvarich, a member of Parliament and a lawyer who represented Mr. Yushchenko in the court's cramped chambers, said the 21 judges had displayed a certain maturity by navigating Ukraine's complicated election laws and, for the first time, establishing a larger precedent based on the primacy of constitutional rights.

"The court took the initiative to fill in gaps in the election laws," he said. "This is a milestone decision. The court took a very courageous stand."

Maidan - How the Votes Were Counted: An Intrusion Into Electronic System

Maidan - How the Votes Were Counted: An Intrusion Into Electronic System

Commentary: Putin's Biggest Blunder

Commentary: Putin's Biggest Blunder

From Busnessweek.com

Youthful Pora Charges Up the People

Youthful Pora Charges Up the People

A description of PORA

Thursday, December 02, 2004

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Bitter lemons

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Bitter lemons

Timothy Garton Ash The Guardian,

A look at the Western European version of the Orange Revolution,

The New York Times - Power Behind the Scenes in Ukraine Crisis

The New York Times > International > Europe > Power Behind the Scenes in Ukraine Crisis

by C.J. Chivers, NY Times

a short interview with Viktor Pinchuk

Wednesday, December 01, 2004

Notes on Wednesday evening

Thoughts on Wednesday events: there seem to be three tracks. First, the Supreme Court will soon find that 2nd round of the presidential election was tainted with fraud. The Rada will develop and past a set of new election regulations that will do away with many of the gaps that exist in the current regime. Finally, the International Roundtable will move to develop the timetable to lead to a new round of elections. Whether this means an entire new set of polling or just a rerun of the 2nd round is difficult to say.

 

At this point of time Victor Yushchenko should win either possible election. If the absentee ballot gaps are closed, if tighter observation standards are applied and if a more observable vote counting system is in place, I see no one else who can take the momentum from him. He has proven himself to be the strongest political candidate Ukraine has ever seen. He should be able to get 60% of any vote regardless of the number of people who will run against him.

 

The other news item of the night, the snow removal truck that was dragging the bribe receipts coming out of the presidential administration compound. It just shows a high degree of carelessness. First rule of bribery, no receipts and then, destroy all the records. It just shows that the administration never considered that Yushchenko could win and there was no plan for destroying documents that they might wish to keep from public view.

Interview with Yuri Karmazin, Our Ukraine Rada member

: "Yuri Karmazin"

Inteview with Yuri Kamazin. The Russian printed Absentee Ballots is a fun idea.

Now Ukraine Has Earned Its Independence

Now Ukraine Has Earned Its Independence

Kremlin's Ukraine Play Sours Investors

Kremlin's Ukraine Play Sours Investors
Some Russian financial implications.

Why Putin Worked Yanukovych's Corner

Why Putin Worked Yanukovych's Corner
Some views of Putin's thinking.

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Family pressure on Kuchma to end the crisis

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Family pressure on Kuchma to end the crisis
a good summary, it is fun to think that Viktor Pinchuk is out walking the streets of Kiev. The final line sums it up.

A new election was "the only way to make the authority of the government legitimate".

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WWW http://notesfromkiev.blogspot.com